January 2011 (Archive)
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Boiling point
McDonald's recalls Shrek glasses due to potential cadmium risk — The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) just announced…
Hogchoker - the new Internet star — A small flatfish living along the coast of North America is the…
Cancer deaths are projected to double by 2030 — Cancer deaths are projected to double in the next two decades.…

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Minuscule
Wasps clock faces like humans — Face recognition in golden paper wasps may be an adaptation to…
Entangled diamonds vibrate together — Objects big enough for the eye to see have been placed in a weirdly…
How animals predict earthquakes — Animals may sense chemical changes in groundwater that occur…
New Icelandic volcano eruption could have global impact — Hundreds of metres under one of Iceland's largest glaciers there…

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News | Archive (4 January 2011)

Archived news stories published on 4 January 2011 [chronologically, reverse order]
DON'T MISS —
GTRI researchers design and test microfabricated planar ion traps
GTRI researchers design and test microfabricated planar ion traps — Despite a steady improvement in the speed of conventional computers during the last few decades, certain types of problems…
Nine new species for disappearing handfish family
Nine new species for disappearing handfish family — Nine new species of handfish have been described by CSIRO in research that highlights an urgent need to better understand…
Global warming's influence on El Nino still unknown
Global warming's influence on El Nino still unknown — The climate of the Pacific region will undergo significant changes as atmospheric temperatures rise but scientists can not…
Remote-access meters can cut your energy costs
Remote-access meters can cut your energy costs — A new web-based smart metering system has been developed by CSIRO to enable householders, small businesses and electricity…

Pregnant, constipated and bloated? Fly poo may tell you why

— 22:56 GMT | Health

Clues about how the human gut helps regulate our appetite have come from a most unusual source - fruit fly faeces. Scientists at the University of Cambridge are using the fruit fly to help understand aspects of human metabolism, including why pregnant women suffer from bloating and constipation, and even the link between a low calorie diet and longevity…

Male pattern balding may be due to stem cell inactivation, according to Penn study

— 22:53 GMT | Health

Given the amount of angst over male pattern balding, surprisingly little is known about its cause at the cellular level. In a new study, published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation, a team led by George Cotsarelis, MD, chair of the Department of Dermatology at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, has found that stem cells play an unexpected role in explaining what happens in bald scalp…

Fueling the body on fat

— 22:53 GMT | Health

Researchers have found what appears to be a critical tuning dial for controlling whole body energy, according to a new report in the January issue of Cell Metabolism, a Cell Press publication. When energy levels within cells drop, it sets off a series of events designed to increase the amount of calorie-rich dietary fat that the body will absorb…

Birch bark ingredient comes with many metabolic benefits

— 22:53 GMT | Health

An ingredient found in abundance in birch bark appears to have an array of metabolic benefits, according to new studies in animals that are reported in the January issue of Cell Metabolism, a Cell Press publication. In mice, the compound known as betulin lowered cholesterol, helped prevent diet-induced obesity, and improved insulin sensitivity. Betulin-treated mice were also more resistant to developing atherosclerotic plaques in their arteries…

MIT researchers study the danger of Toxoplasma parasites

— 22:53 GMT | Health

About one-third of the human population is infected with a parasite called Toxoplasma gondii, but most of them don't know it. Though Toxoplasma causes no symptoms in most people, it can be harmful to individuals with suppressed immune systems, and to foetuses whose mothers become infected during pregnancy. Toxoplasma spores are found in dirt and easily infect farm animals such as cows, sheep, pigs and chickens. Humans can be infected by eating undercooked meat or unwashed vegetables…

Experimental drug more potent, longer lasting than morphine

— 22:53 GMT | Health

A little-known morphinelike drug is potentially more potent, longer lasting and less likely to cause constipation than standard morphine, a study led by a Loyola University Health System anaesthesiologist has found…

The ecosystem engineer: Research looks at beavers' role in river restoration

— 22:52 GMT | Environment

When engineers restore rivers, one Kansas State University professor hopes they'll keep a smaller engineer in mind: the North American beaver…

Risk of breast cancer recurrence may depend on treating surgeon

— 22:51 GMT | Health

Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), or non-invasive breast cancer, is typically treated with either breast-conserving surgery - with or without follow-up radiation - or mastectomy. The treatment choice depends on clinical factors, the treating surgeon, and patient preferences. Long-term health outcomes (disease-free survival) depend on the treatments received. According to a study published January 3 in The Journal of the National Cancer Institute, however, health outcomes also are associated with the treating surgeon…

Peptide delivers 1-2 punch to breast cancer in pre-clinical study

— 22:51 GMT | Health

Researchers at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Centre (WFUBMC) have discovered what may become a new weapon in the fight against breast cancer. For the first time, a peptide found in blood and tissue has been shown to inhibit the growth of human breast tumours in mice, according to a study recently published in the journal Cancer Research…

Current smokers with early rheumatoid arthritis less responsive to TNF inhibitors, methotrexate

— 22:51 GMT | Health

Patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) who are current smokers were less likely to achieve good response to methotrexate (MTX) and tumour necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors than those who never smoked. The study by researchers from Sweden also found that RA patients who smoked in the past did not experience a lower response to these therapies. Results of the 10-year study appear in the January 2011 issue of Arthritis and Rheumatism, a journal published by Wiley-Blackwell on behalf of the American College of Rheumatology (ACR)…

4 January 2011 — 81 stories
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Hubble finds star eating a planetHubble finds star eating a planet

— The hottest known planet in the Milky Way galaxy may also be its shortest-lived world. The doomed planet is being eaten by its parent star, according to observations…

A compound in smokers' breathA compound in smokers' breath

— If you smoke, your breath contains 2,5-dimethylfuran. A team of Catalan researchers have proved that the presence of this chemical compound indicates that a person…