January 2011 (Archive)
  • 2
  • 31

Boiling point
McDonald's recalls Shrek glasses due to potential cadmium risk — The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) just announced…
Hogchoker - the new Internet star — A small flatfish living along the coast of North America is the…
Cancer deaths are projected to double by 2030 — Cancer deaths are projected to double in the next two decades.…

More Boiling point
Minuscule
Wasps clock faces like humans — Face recognition in golden paper wasps may be an adaptation to…
Entangled diamonds vibrate together — Objects big enough for the eye to see have been placed in a weirdly…
How animals predict earthquakes — Animals may sense chemical changes in groundwater that occur…
New Icelandic volcano eruption could have global impact — Hundreds of metres under one of Iceland's largest glaciers there…

More Minuscule
RSS feeds, newsletter
Find the topic you want. Science Centric offers several RSS feeds for the News section.

Or subscribe for our Newsletter, a free e-mail publication. It is published practically every day.
Where am I? > Home > News

News | Archive (6 January 2011)

Archived news stories published on 6 January 2011 [chronologically, reverse order]
DON'T MISS —
Prehistoric winged beasts 'pole-vaulted' into flight
Prehistoric winged beasts 'pole-vaulted' into flight — Controversial claims that enormous prehistoric winged beasts could not fly have been refuted by the most comprehensive study…
Astronomers find giant, previously unseen structure in our galaxy
Astronomers find giant, previously unseen structure in our galaxy — NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has unveiled a previously unseen structure centred in the Milky Way - a finding likened…
Atoms-for-peace: A galactic collision in action
Atoms-for-peace: A galactic collision in action — European Southern Observatory astronomers have produced a spectacular new image of the famous Atoms-for-Peace galaxy (NGC…
Study links fresh Mars gullies to carbon dioxide
Study links fresh Mars gullies to carbon dioxide — A growing bounty of images from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter reveals that the timing of new activity in one type of…

Syracuse University team develops functionally graded shape memory polymers

— 15:47 GMT | Technology

A team led by Patrick T. Mather, director of Syracuse Biomaterials Institute (SBI) and Milton and Ann Stevenson professor of biomedical and chemical engineering in Syracuse University's L.C. Smith College of Engineering and Computer Science (LCS), has succeeded in applying the concept of functionally graded materials (FGMs) to shape memory polymers (SMPs)…

Carbon taxes are the answer to the stalled climate negotiations

— 15:44 GMT | Environment

For global warming policy, the 2009 United Nations Climate Change Conference (Copenhagen Summit) was a major disappointment. Designed to negotiate a successor to the Kyoto Protocol, which expires in 2012, the Summit concluded without a binding agreement because of deep divisions on the distribution of emissions reductions and costs. In addition, the United States failed to take action on a carbon cap-and-trade bill in 2010. Confronting this policy vacuum, leading climate economist William Nordhaus argues in the Bulletin of Atomic Scientists, published today, that carbon taxes are the best approach to achieve significant emissions reductions…

Antibiotic resistance is not just genetic

— 15:41 GMT | Health

Genetic resistance to antibiotics is not the only trick bacteria use to resist eradication - they also have a second defence strategy known as persistence that can kick in…

New findings show vitamin D accelerates recovery from TB

— 15:38 GMT | Health

New research findings which show that vitamin D can speed up antibiotic treatment of tuberculosis (TB) have been revealed by scientists at Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry. The study - which gives fresh insight into how vitamin D may affect the immune response - is published today (6 January 2011) in The Lancet…

Protective properties of green tea uncovered

— 15:35 GMT | Health

Regularly drinking green tea could protect the brain against developing Alzheimer's and other forms of dementia, according to latest research by scientists at Newcastle University…

Widespread ancient ocean 'dead zones' challenged early life

— 15:32 GMT | Geology and palaeontology

The oceans became oxygen-rich as they are today about 600 million years ago, during Earth's Late Ediacaran Period. Before that, most scientists believed until recently, the ancient oceans were relatively oxygen-poor for the preceding four billion years…

Globally sustainable fisheries possible with co-management

— 15:29 GMT | Environment

The bulk of the world's fisheries - including the kind of small-scale, often non-industrialised fisheries that millions of people depend on for food - could be sustained using community-based co-management. This is the conclusion of a study reported in this week's issue of the journal Nature…

Malfunctioning gene associated with Lou Gehrig's disease leads to nerve-cell death in mice

— 15:26 GMT | Health

Lou Gehrig's disease, or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) are characterised by protein clumps in brain and spinal-cord cells that include an RNA-binding protein called TDP-43. This protein is the major building block of the lesions formed by these clumps…

Rifaximin provides significant relief of irritable bowel syndrome symptoms

— 15:23 GMT | Health

A pair of clinical trials, conducted in part at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, found that two weeks of treatment with rifaximin provides significant relief of irritable bowel syndrome symptoms including bloating, abdominal pain and loose or watery stools…

Scientists now know why some cancers become malignant and others don't

— 15:20 GMT | Health

Cancer cells reproduce by dividing in two, but a molecule known as PML limits how many times this can happen, according to researchers lead by Dr Gerardo Ferbeyre of the University of Montreal's Department of Biochemistry. The team proved that malignant cancers have problems with this molecule, meaning that in its absence they can continue to grow and eventually spread to other organs. Importantly, the presence of PML molecules can easily be detected, and could serve to diagnose whether a tumour is malignant or not…

6 January 2011 — 19 stories
Page 1 of 2 Next Last

More on Science Centric's News

New snub-nosed monkey discovered in Northern MyanmarNew snub-nosed monkey discovered in Northern Myanmar

— An international team of primatologists have discovered a new species of monkey in Northern Myanmar (formerly Burma.) The research, published in the American Journal…

Hubble data used to look 10,000 years into the futureHubble data used to look 10,000 years into the future

— The globular star cluster Omega Centauri has caught the attention of sky watchers ever since the ancient astronomer Ptolemy first catalogued it 2,000 years ago.…