September 2010 (Archive)

Boiling point
McDonald's recalls Shrek glasses due to potential cadmium risk — The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) just announced…
Hogchoker - the new Internet star — A small flatfish living along the coast of North America is the…
Cancer deaths are projected to double by 2030 — Cancer deaths are projected to double in the next two decades.…

More Boiling point
Minuscule
Wasps clock faces like humans — Face recognition in golden paper wasps may be an adaptation to…
Entangled diamonds vibrate together — Objects big enough for the eye to see have been placed in a weirdly…
How animals predict earthquakes — Animals may sense chemical changes in groundwater that occur…
New Icelandic volcano eruption could have global impact — Hundreds of metres under one of Iceland's largest glaciers there…

More Minuscule
RSS feeds, newsletter
Find the topic you want. Science Centric offers several RSS feeds for the News section.

Or subscribe for our Newsletter, a free e-mail publication. It is published practically every day.
Where am I? > Home > News

News | Archive (7 September 2010)

Archived news stories published on 7 September 2010 [chronologically, reverse order]
DON'T MISS —
Hubble telescope snaps images of a nebula within a cluster
Hubble telescope snaps images of a nebula within a cluster — The unique planetary nebula NGC 2818 is nested inside the open star cluster NGC 2818A. Both the cluster and the nebula reside…
Five years of Mainz technology on Mars
Five years of Mainz technology on Mars — On 4 January 2004, NASA's rover 'Spirit' landed safely on Mars after a seven-month voyage through space. Three weeks later,…
IBM Research creates microscope with 100 million times finer resolution than current MRI
IBM Research creates microscope with 100 million times finer resolution than current MRI — IBM Research scientists, in collaboration with the Centre for Probing the Nanoscale at Stanford University, have demonstrated…
Microscopic morphology adds to the scorpion family tree
Microscopic morphology adds to the scorpion family tree — Modern microscopy technology has allowed two scorpion biologists, Carsten Kamenz of the Humboldt University in Berlin and…

First Irish genome sequenced

— 12:06 GMT | Biology

The first entire genome of an Irish individual has been sequenced. The sequence is reported in BioMed Central's open access journal, Genome Biology and provides insight into the evolutionary history of this distinct lineage…

GOCE gravity mission back in action

— 12:03 GMT | Environment

ESA's GOCE gravity mission has recovered from a glitch that prevented the satellite from sending its flow of scientific data to the ground. News of the recovery comes earlier than expected, thanks to the fervent efforts of a team of experts…

What can a New Zealand reptile tell us about false teeth?

— 12:00 GMT | Biology

Using a moving 3D computer model based on the skull and teeth of a New Zealand reptile called tuatara, a BBSRC-funded team from the University of Hull, University College London and the Hull York Medical School has revealed how damage to dental implants and jaw joints may be prevented by sophisticated interplay between our jaws, muscles and brain. This research will appear in a future edition of the Journal of Biomechanics…

The brain speaks

— 11:57 GMT | Biology

In an early step toward letting severely paralysed people speak with their thoughts, University of Utah researchers translated brain signals into words using two grids of 16 microelectrodes implanted beneath the skull but atop the brain…

Visual pattern preference may be indicator of autism in toddlers

— 11:54 GMT | Health

Using eye-tracking methods, researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have shown that toddlers with autism spend significantly more time visually examining dynamic geometric patterns than they do looking at social images - a viewing pattern not found in either typical or developmentally delayed toddlers. The results of the study suggest that a preference for geometric patterns early in life may be a signature behaviour in infants who are at-risk for autism. This preference was found in infants at-risk for autism as young as 14 months of age…

With HMGB1's help, cells dine in

— 11:51 GMT | Health

Like some people, cells eat when they are under pressure - but they consume parts of themselves. A multi-function protein helps control this form of cannibalism, according to a study in the September 6 issue of the Journal of Cell Biology (www.jcb.org)…

Researchers define role of CEP290 in maintaining ciliary function

— 11:48 GMT | Health

A new study in the September 6 issue of the Journal of Cell Biology (www.jcb.org) helps define the role of an important ciliary protein, CEP290. The results could be applied toward targeted gene therapy in cilia-related diseases…

Radiologists identify and treat teenage self-injury

— 11:45 GMT | Health

Using ultrasound and a minimally-invasive procedure, radiologists can identify and treat patients who engage in a disturbing self-injury behaviour known as self-embedding, according to a new study published in the online edition and October print issue of the journal Radiology…

Many hospital emergency department visits could be treated elsewhere, study finds

— 11:42 GMT | Health

About 17 percent of all visits to hospital emergency departments across the United States could be treated at retail medical clinics or urgent care centres, potentially saving $4.4 billion annually in health care costs, according to a new RAND Corporation study…

New treatment activates death program in cancer cells

— 11:39 GMT | Health

Cancer is a difficult disease to treat because it's a personal disease. Each case is unique and based on a combination of environmental and genetic factors. Conventional chemotherapy employs treatment with one or more drugs, assuming that these medicines are able to both 'diagnose' and 'treat' the affected cells. Many of the side effects experienced by chemotherapy patients are due to the fact that the drugs they are taking aren't selective enough. For instance, taking a drug that targets fast-growing tumour cells frequently results in hair loss, because cells in the hair follicle are among some of the fastest growing in the body. When it comes down to it, these drugs get the diagnosis wrong…

7 September 2010 — 17 stories
Page 1 of 2 Next Last

More on Science Centric's News

Researchers control the assembly of nanobristles into helical clustersResearchers control the assembly of nanobristles into helical clusters

— From the structure of DNA to nautical rope to distant spiral galaxies, helical forms are as abundant as they are useful in nature and manufacturing alike. Researchers…

Hubble finds stars that go 'ballistic'Hubble finds stars that go 'ballistic'

— Even some stars go ballistic, racing through interstellar space like bullets and tearing through clouds of gas. Images from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope reveal…