August 2007 (Archive)

Boiling point
McDonald's recalls Shrek glasses due to potential cadmium risk — The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) just announced…
Hogchoker - the new Internet star — A small flatfish living along the coast of North America is the…
Cancer deaths are projected to double by 2030 — Cancer deaths are projected to double in the next two decades.…

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Minuscule
Wasps clock faces like humans — Face recognition in golden paper wasps may be an adaptation to…
Entangled diamonds vibrate together — Objects big enough for the eye to see have been placed in a weirdly…
How animals predict earthquakes — Animals may sense chemical changes in groundwater that occur…
New Icelandic volcano eruption could have global impact — Hundreds of metres under one of Iceland's largest glaciers there…

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News | Archive (10 August 2007)

Archived news stories published on 10 August 2007 [chronologically, reverse order]
DON'T MISS —
All for one and one for all
All for one and one for all — There is strength in numbers if you want to get your voice heard. But how to do you get your say if you are in the minority?…
The light and dark face of a star-forming nebula
The light and dark face of a star-forming nebula — Gum 19 is located in the direction of the constellation Vela (the Sail) at a distance of approximately 22 000 light years.…
New dinosaur from Utah's red rocks
New dinosaur from Utah's red rocks — Utah's red rocks - world-famous attractions at numerous national parks, monuments and state parks - have yielded a rare skeleton…
Astronomers get sharpest view ever of star factories in distant universe
Astronomers get sharpest view ever of star factories in distant universe — Astronomers have combined a natural gravitational lens and a sophisticated telescope array to get the sharpest view ever…

Man-made soot contributed to warming in Greenland in the early 20th century

— 14:45 GMT | Environment

New research shows that industrial development in North America between 1850 and 1950 greatly increased the amount of black carbon - commonly known as soot - that fell on Greenland's glaciers and ice sheets. The soot impacted the ability of the snow and ice to reflect sunlight, which contributed to increased melting and higher temperatures in the region during those years. This discovery may help scientists better understand the impact of human activities on polar climates…

Floods in Asia visible from space

— 14:45 GMT | Environment

Wide area satellite images can show an entire flood within a single picture, with radar instruments like Envisat's Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR) especially well suited for differentiating between waterlogged and dry land. A sequence of satellite images can show if the flood is growing or diminishing over time, and highlight further areas coming under threat of inundation. This actual image is a multitemporal ASAR image composed of two images: one acquired on 26 July 2007 and another on 12 April 2007…

Galileo to support global search and rescue

— 09:54 GMT | Astronomy

The detection of emergency beacons will be greatly improved by the introduction of Europe's satellite positioning system, Galileo. The Galileo satellites will carry transponders to relay distress signals to search and rescue organisations. In connection with this, representatives of the Galileo project attended the recent 21st annual Joint Committee Meeting of COSPAS-SARSAT, the international programme for satellite-aided search and rescue. The partners in Galileo are committed to developing the Galileo search and rescue component as an integral part of MEOSAR, the future worldwide search and rescue satellite system…

X-ray images help explain limits to insect body size

— 09:54 GMT | Biology

Researchers at the US Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory have cast new light on why the giant insects that lived millions of years ago disappeared. In the late Palaeozoic Era, with atmospheric oxygen levels reaching record highs, some insects evolved into giants. When oxygen levels returned to lower levels, the insect giants went extinct. The basis of this gigantism is thought to lie in the insect respiratory system. In contrast to vertebrates, where blood transports oxygen from the lung to the cell, insects deliver oxygen directly through a network of blind-ending tracheal tubes. As insects get bigger, this type of oxygen transport becomes far less effective…

10 August 2007 — 4 stories
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