September 2010 (Archive)

Boiling point
McDonald's recalls Shrek glasses due to potential cadmium risk — The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) just announced…
Hogchoker - the new Internet star — A small flatfish living along the coast of North America is the…
Cancer deaths are projected to double by 2030 — Cancer deaths are projected to double in the next two decades.…

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Minuscule
Wasps clock faces like humans — Face recognition in golden paper wasps may be an adaptation to…
Entangled diamonds vibrate together — Objects big enough for the eye to see have been placed in a weirdly…
How animals predict earthquakes — Animals may sense chemical changes in groundwater that occur…
New Icelandic volcano eruption could have global impact — Hundreds of metres under one of Iceland's largest glaciers there…

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News | Archive (14 September 2010)

Archived news stories published on 14 September 2010 [chronologically, reverse order]
DON'T MISS —
Partial lunar eclipse today, 16 August
Partial lunar eclipse today, 16 August — People across the world will have the chance to see a partial eclipse of the Moon today, 16 August 2008. In a partial lunar…
Scientists discover new bird species
Scientists discover new bird species — Scientists at the Smithsonian Institution have discovered a new species of bird in Gabon, Africa, that was, until now, unknown…
Aerosols' impact on Australia's climate
Aerosols' impact on Australia's climate — The impact that human-generated and natural atmospheric particles (aerosols) could be having on Australia's climate will…
Cassini spacecraft pinpoints source of jets on Enceladus
Cassini spacecraft pinpoints source of jets on Enceladus — In a feat of interplanetary sharpshooting, NASA's Cassini spacecraft has pinpointed precisely where the icy jets erupt from…

Would a molecular horse trot, pace or glide across a surface?

— 11:37 GMT | Technology

Molecular machines can be found everywhere in nature, for example, transporting proteins through cells and aiding metabolism. To develop artificial molecular machines, scientists need to understand the rules that govern mechanics at the molecular or nanometre scale (a nanometre is a billionth of a metre)…

UC Davis scientists find link between arthritis pain reliever and cardiovascular events

— 11:34 GMT | Health

A research team from the University of California, Davis and Peking University, China, has discovered a novel mechanism as to why the long-term, high-dosage use of the well-known arthritis pain medication, Vioxx, led to heart attacks and strokes. Their groundbreaking research may pave the way for a safer drug for millions of arthritis patients who suffer acute and chronic pain…

First-of-its-kind study shows supervised injection facilities can help people quit drugs

— 11:31 GMT | Health

A study led by researchers at the BC Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS (BC-CfE) at St. Paul's Hospital and the University of British Columbia has found that supervised injection facilities such as Vancouver's Insite connect clients with addiction treatment, which in turn resulted in greater likelihood of stopping injection drug use for at least six months…

Study identifies underlying dysfunction of seemingly non-critical heart condition

— 11:29 GMT | Health

Repairing small, seemingly benign holes in a child's heart may be more clinically important than previously thought, as dysfunction could be lurking out of sight. These are the findings from a study conducted by doctors and researchers at Nationwide Children's Hospital and the Ohio State University Medical Centre examining a subset of the most common form of congenital heart disease, ventricular septal defect. The recently published study appears in the Journal of Molecular and Cellular Cardiology, the official journal of the International Society for Heart Research…

Your body recycling itself - captured on film

— 11:25 GMT | Health

Our bodies recycle proteins, the fundamental building blocks that enable cell growth and development. Proteins are made up of a chain of amino acids, and scientists have known since the 1980s that first one in the chain determines the lifetime of a protein. McGill researchers have finally discovered how the cell identifies this first amino acid - and caught it on camera…

Children and adults see the world differently

— 11:22 GMT | Health

Unlike adults, children are able to keep information from their senses separate and may therefore perceive the visual world differently, according to research published today…

Male maturity shaped by early nutrition

— 11:19 GMT | Health

It seems the old nature versus nurture debate can't be won. But a new Northwestern University study of men in the Philippines makes a strong case for nurture's role in male to female differences - suggesting that rapid weight gain in the first six months of life predicts earlier puberty for boys…

NASA sees Tropical Storm Julia born with strong thunderstorms and heavy rainfall

— 11:16 GMT | Environment

Tropical Depression 12 was born in the far eastern Atlantic Ocean yesterday, Sept. 12 and two NASA satellites saw factors that indicated she would later strengthen into Tropical Storm Julia. Infrared imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite revealed strong convection in its centre that powered the storm into tropical storm status by 11 p.m. EDT. NASA's TRMM satellite indicated very heavy rainfall from that strong area of convection…

Igor now a Category 4 hurricane with icy cloud tops and heavy rainfall

— 11:13 GMT | Environment

NASA Satellites have noticed two distinct features in Igor that both indicate how powerful he has become, icy cold, high cloud tops and very heavy rainfall. NASA's Aqua and TRMM satellites have provided that insight to forecasters who are predicting Igor's next move as a powerful Category 4 Hurricane…

Study finds that sorghum bran has more antioxidants than blueberries, pomegranates

— 11:10 GMT | Biology

A new University of Georgia study has found that select varieties of sorghum bran have greater antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties than well-known foods such as blueberries and pomegranates…

14 September 2010 — 40 stories
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More on Science Centric's News

Engineers create 3-D material that can bend light backwardsEngineers create 3-D material that can bend light backwards

— Engineers at the University of California, Berkeley, have for the first time designed 3-D materials that can reverse the natural direction of visible and near-infrared…

Mass extinction of large prehistoric animals - a result of human huntingMass extinction of large prehistoric animals - a result of human hunting

— Research led by UK and Australian scientists sheds new light on the role that our ancestors played in the extinction of Australia's prehistoric animals. The study,…