September 2010 (Archive)

Boiling point
McDonald's recalls Shrek glasses due to potential cadmium risk — The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) just announced…
Hogchoker - the new Internet star — A small flatfish living along the coast of North America is the…
Cancer deaths are projected to double by 2030 — Cancer deaths are projected to double in the next two decades.…

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Minuscule
Wasps clock faces like humans — Face recognition in golden paper wasps may be an adaptation to…
Entangled diamonds vibrate together — Objects big enough for the eye to see have been placed in a weirdly…
How animals predict earthquakes — Animals may sense chemical changes in groundwater that occur…
New Icelandic volcano eruption could have global impact — Hundreds of metres under one of Iceland's largest glaciers there…

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News | Archive (16 September 2010)

Archived news stories published on 16 September 2010 [chronologically, reverse order]
DON'T MISS —
NASA Mars rovers near five years of science and discovery
NASA Mars rovers near five years of science and discovery — NASA rovers Spirit and Opportunity may still have big achievements ahead as they approach the fifth anniversaries of their…
Physicists at Mainz University generate ultracold neutrons at the TRIGA Reactor
Physicists at Mainz University generate ultracold neutrons at the TRIGA Reactor — For the first time ever, scientists at the TRIGA research reactor of the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz have determined…
Can Nintendo Wii game consoles improve family fitness?
Can Nintendo Wii game consoles improve family fitness? — Consumer research suggests the Nintendo Wii Fit video game console was among this year's most popular Christmas gifts, but…
What is powering your Christmas lights?
What is powering your Christmas lights? — From Santa's cave to the neon-lit streetscapes of Australian suburbia, the dazzle of Christmas lights heralds the arrival…

Johns Hopkins scientists find genes related to body mass

— 05:40 GMT | Health

Johns Hopkins scientists who specialise in unconventional hunts for genetic information outside nuclear DNA sequences have bagged a weighty quarry - 13 genes linked to human body mass. The experiments screened the so-called epigenome for key information that cells remember other than the DNA code itself and may have serious implications for preventing and treating obesity, the investigators say…

Children's brain development is linked to physical fitness

— 05:37 GMT | Health

Researchers have found an association between physical fitness and the brain in 9- and 10-year-old children: Those who are more fit tend to have a bigger hippocampus and perform better on a test of memory than their less-fit peers…

The friendly way to catch the flu

— 05:34 GMT | Health

Your friends are probably more popular than you are. And this 'friendship paradox' may help predict the spread of infectious disease…

Molecule involved in heart failure now implicated in heart attack damage

— 05:31 GMT | Health

A molecule known to be involved in progressive heart failure has now been shown to also lead to permanent damage after a heart attack, according to researchers at Thomas Jefferson University…

Mild memory loss is not a part of normal ageing

— 05:28 GMT | Health

Simply getting older is not the cause of mild memory lapses often called senior moments, according to a new study by researchers at the Rush Alzheimer's Disease Centre. The study, published in the September 15, 2010, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology, found that even the very early mild changes in memory that are much more common in old age than dementia are caused by the same brain lesions associated with Alzheimer's disease and other dementias…

Rice study examines how bacteria acquire immunity

— 05:25 GMT | Health

In a new study this week, Rice University scientists bring the latest tools of computational biology to bear in examining how the processes of natural selection and evolution influence the way bacteria acquire immunity from disease…

Research shows radiometric dating still reliable (again)

— 05:22 GMT | Technology

Recent puzzling observations of tiny variations in nuclear decay rates have led some to question the science of using decay rates to determine the relative ages of rocks and organic materials. Scientists from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), working with researchers from Purdue University, the University of Tennessee, Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Wabash College, tested the hypothesis that solar radiation might affect the rate at which radioactive elements decay and found no detectable effect…

New wave: Spin soliton could be a hit in cell phone communication

— 05:19 GMT | Technology

Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have found theoretical evidence of a new way to generate the high-frequency waves used in modern communication devices such as cell phones. Their analysis, if supported by experimental evidence, could contribute to a new generation of wireless technology that would be more secure and resistant to interference than conventional devices…

New GSI website experience puts product standards on the map

— 05:16 GMT | Technology

Those looking for the latest product standards-related news, regulatory developments, events and workshops around the world now can turn to the new Global Standards Information (GSI) Web site (http://gsi.nist.gov). Launched on Sept. 1, 2010, the new site includes a variety of interactive tools and will serve as an essential 'first stop' for users seeking up-to-date information on international product standards…

New supercomputer 'sees' well enough to drive a car someday

— 05:13 GMT | Technology

Navigating our way down the street is something most of us take for granted; we seem to recognise cars, other people, trees and lampposts instantaneously and without much thought. In fact, visually interpreting our environment as quickly as we do is an astonishing feat requiring an enormous number of computations - which is just one reason that coming up with a computer-driven system that can mimic the human brain in visually recognising objects has proven so difficult…

16 September 2010 — 20 stories
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