August 2007 (Archive)

Boiling point
McDonald's recalls Shrek glasses due to potential cadmium risk — The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) just announced…
Hogchoker - the new Internet star — A small flatfish living along the coast of North America is the…
Cancer deaths are projected to double by 2030 — Cancer deaths are projected to double in the next two decades.…

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Minuscule
Wasps clock faces like humans — Face recognition in golden paper wasps may be an adaptation to…
Entangled diamonds vibrate together — Objects big enough for the eye to see have been placed in a weirdly…
How animals predict earthquakes — Animals may sense chemical changes in groundwater that occur…
New Icelandic volcano eruption could have global impact — Hundreds of metres under one of Iceland's largest glaciers there…

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News | Archive (18 August 2007)

Archived news stories published on 18 August 2007 [chronologically, reverse order]
DON'T MISS —
The Australian E-Health Research Centre joins Open Health Tools Foundation
The Australian E-Health Research Centre joins Open Health Tools Foundation — The Australian E-Health Research Centre (AEHRC) - a joint venture between CSIRO and the Queensland Government - has joined…
Study offers new evidence of how snake fangs evolved from regular teeth
Study offers new evidence of how snake fangs evolved from regular teeth — A study published in the most recent issue of Nature offers new evidence for how snake fangs evolved from regular teeth.…
Mars Express acquires sharpest images of Phobos
Mars Express acquires sharpest images of Phobos — Mars Express closed in on the intriguing Martian moon Phobos at 6:49 CEST on 23 July, flying past at 3 km/s, only 93 km from…
SDSC urges academia to make cyberinfrastructure 'real'
SDSC urges academia to make cyberinfrastructure 'real' — Comprising the 'infrastructure' for the Information Age, cyberinfrastructure - the organised aggregate of information technologies,…

New continent and species discovered in Atlantic study

— 15:20 GMT | Biology

A scientist from the University of Aberdeen is leading a team of international researchers whose work will continue our understanding of life in the deepest oceans, and contribute to the global Census of Marine Life. Exploring life in the North Atlantic Ocean at various depths of 800 to 3.500 metres, a team of 31 scientists are returning from a five-week scientific expedition which has surfaced a wealth of new information and insights, stunning images and marine life specimens, with one species thought to be new to science. The international team will be arriving in Scotland today (Saturday, August 18) following the expedition along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) between Iceland and the Azores on board the Royal Research Ship, James Cook…

Invasive Australian jellyfish sighted in Gulf of Mexico in summer 2007

— 15:20 GMT | Biology

The invasive Australian jellyfish, Phyllorhiza punctata, first reported in great quantities in the Gulf of Mexico in 2000, has made a vigorous reappearance this summer in waters from southwestern Louisiana to Morehead City, North Carolina. Beachgoers and boaters are encouraged to report their sightings of these exotic jellies to the Dauphin Island Sea Lab's jellyfish website, Dockwatch. Since 2000, Phyllorhiza sightings have occurred in the Gulf as far west as Galveston Bay, Texas, but only in a handful of numbers. This year, not only are their numbers higher, but their range has extended up to the Mid-Atlantic states. 'Reports from the Panhandle of Florida and North Carolina indicate they're pretty concentrated elsewhere,' states Dauphin Island Sea Lab Senior Marine Scientist Dr Monty Graham…

Planets like earth may have formed around other stars

— 15:20 GMT | Astronomy

The chemical fingerprint of a burned-out star indicates that Earth-like planets may not be rare in the universe and could give clues to what our solar system will look like when our sun dies and becomes a white dwarf star some five billion years from now. Astronomers from UCLA report that a white dwarf star known as GD 362, which is surrounded by dusty rings similar to those of Saturn, has been contaminated by a large asteroid that left more than a dozen observable chemical elements in the white dwarf's atmosphere. Such an observation is unprecedented in astronomy…

Researchers track declining timber rattlesnakes

— 15:20 GMT | Biology

Western Carolina University researchers are using geographic information systems technology and radio transmitters to track timber rattlesnakes this fall to determine whether new mountain subdivisions and road-building are pushing an animal listed as a 'species of special concern' toward the endangered list. Ron Davis, WCU assistant professor of natural resources management, is spearheading the pilot project in which timber rattlers are implanted with special radio transmitter chips by a veterinarian. After their recovery, the snakes are released back into the wild and then monitored to study their habitat and their range…

18 August 2007 — 4 stories
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