January 2011 (Archive)
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Boiling point
McDonald's recalls Shrek glasses due to potential cadmium risk — The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) just announced…
Hogchoker - the new Internet star — A small flatfish living along the coast of North America is the…
Cancer deaths are projected to double by 2030 — Cancer deaths are projected to double in the next two decades.…

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Wasps clock faces like humans — Face recognition in golden paper wasps may be an adaptation to…
Entangled diamonds vibrate together — Objects big enough for the eye to see have been placed in a weirdly…
How animals predict earthquakes — Animals may sense chemical changes in groundwater that occur…
New Icelandic volcano eruption could have global impact — Hundreds of metres under one of Iceland's largest glaciers there…

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News | Archive (23 January 2011)

Archived news stories published on 23 January 2011 [chronologically, reverse order]
DON'T MISS —
Manipulation of photons at crystal surface
Manipulation of photons at crystal surface — In the most recent (16 July) issue of Nature Japanese researchers reveal manipulation of photons at the surface of photonic…
Fermi finds gamma-ray galaxy surprises
Fermi finds gamma-ray galaxy surprises — Back in June 1991, just before the launch of NASA's Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory, astronomers knew of gamma rays from exactly…
MTV survey cranks up the volume on loud music's impact on hearing
MTV survey cranks up the volume on loud music's impact on hearing — Children and adults at risk of permanent hearing loss due to repeated exposure to loud music would turn down the sound or…
Floral changes across the Triassic-Jurassic boundary linked to extensive volcanism
Floral changes across the Triassic-Jurassic boundary linked to extensive volcanism — The turnover of land plants in Europe at the boundary of the Triassic and Jurassic periods, 200 million years ago, was driven…

Nepal translocates first wild tiger

— 19:56 GMT | Environment

A wild tiger fitted with satellite-collar was successfully translocated from Nepal's Chitwan National Park to Bardia National Park for the first time on Saturday…

Delving into the past of a big cat - researchers re-define the clouded leopard

— 19:53 GMT | Biology

Using genetic and morphological analyses, an international team of researchers led by the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research, Berlin, has recently demonstrated that the clouded leopard (Neofelis) should not only be classified into two species, but that one of which even comprises two distinct subspecies…

Unexpected find opens up new front in effort to stop HIV

— 19:50 GMT | Health

HIV adapts in a surprising way to survive and thrive in its hiding spot within the human immune system, scientists have learned. While the finding helps explain why HIV remains such a formidable foe after three decades of research - more than 30 million people worldwide are infected with HIV - it also offers scientists a new, unexpected way to try to stop the virus…

Researchers find smoking gun of world's biggest extinction

— 19:47 GMT | Environment

About 250 million years about 95 per cent of life was wiped out in the sea and 70 per cent on land. Researchers at the University of Calgary believe they have discovered evidence to support massive volcanic eruptions burnt significant volumes of coal, producing ash clouds that had broad impact on global oceans…

Curved carbon for electronics of the future

— 19:44 GMT | Technology

A new scientific discovery could have profound implications for nanoelectronic components. Researchers from the Nano-Science Centre at the Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, in collaboration with Japanese researchers, have shown how electrons on thin tubes of graphite exhibit a unique interaction between their motion and their attached magnetic field - the so-called spin. The discovery paves the way for unprecedented control over the spin of electrons and may have a big impact on applications for spin-based nanoelectronics. The results have been published in the prestigious journal Nature Physics…

Culprit found for increased stroke injury with diabetes

— 19:41 GMT | Health

Strokes are a leading cause of mortality and adult disability. Those that involve intracerebral haemorrhage (bleeding in the brain) are especially deadly, and there are no effective treatments to control such bleeding. Moreover, diabetes and hyperglycaemia (high blood glucose levels) are associated with increases in bleeding during haemorrhagic stroke and worse clinical outcomes…

Genetic sequencing alone doesn't offer a true picture of human disease

— 19:38 GMT | Health

Despite what you might have heard, genetic sequencing alone is not enough to understand human disease. Researchers at Duke University Medical Centre have shown that functional tests are absolutely necessary to understand the biological relevance of the results of sequencing studies as they relate to disease, using a suite of diseases known as the ciliopathies which can cause patients to have many different traits…

Nailing down a crucial plant signalling system

— 19:35 GMT | Biology

Plant biologists have discovered the last major element of the series of chemical signals that one class of plant hormones, called brassinosteroids, send from a protein on the surface of a plant cell to the cell's nucleus. Although many steps of the pathway were already known, new research from a team including Carnegie's Ying Sun and Zhiyong Wang fills in a missing gap about the mechanism through which brassinosteroids cause plant genes to be expressed. Their research, which will be published online by Nature Cell Biology on January 23, has implications for agricultural science and, potentially, evolutionary research…

23 January 2011 — 8 stories
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