January 2011 (Archive)
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Boiling point
McDonald's recalls Shrek glasses due to potential cadmium risk — The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) just announced…
Hogchoker - the new Internet star — A small flatfish living along the coast of North America is the…
Cancer deaths are projected to double by 2030 — Cancer deaths are projected to double in the next two decades.…

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Minuscule
Wasps clock faces like humans — Face recognition in golden paper wasps may be an adaptation to…
Entangled diamonds vibrate together — Objects big enough for the eye to see have been placed in a weirdly…
How animals predict earthquakes — Animals may sense chemical changes in groundwater that occur…
New Icelandic volcano eruption could have global impact — Hundreds of metres under one of Iceland's largest glaciers there…

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News | Archive (26 January 2011)

Archived news stories published on 26 January 2011 [chronologically, reverse order]
DON'T MISS —
Bitter-tasting nectar and floral odours optimise out-crossing for plants
Bitter-tasting nectar and floral odours optimise out-crossing for plants — Animals 'personally' bring their gametes together - seeking out sexual partners, mating, fertilising, and reproducing. Plants,…
The effects of quantum 'traffic jam' in high-temperature superconductors
The effects of quantum 'traffic jam' in high-temperature superconductors — Researchers at the U.S. DOE's Brookhaven National Laboratory, in collaboration with colleagues at Cornell University, Tokyo…
Phoenix is digging deeper
Phoenix is digging deeper — The next sample of Martian soil being grabbed for analysis is coming from a trench about three times deeper than any other…
Exploding chromosomes fuel research about evolution
Exploding chromosomes fuel research about evolution — Human cells somehow squeeze two metres of double-stranded DNA into the space of a typical chromosome, a package 10,000 times…

Nanowires exhibit giant piezoelectricity

— 19:28 GMT | Technology

Gallium nitride (GaN) and zinc oxide (ZnO) are among the most technologically relevant semiconducting materials. Gallium nitride is ubiquitous today in optoelectronic elements such as blue lasers (hence the blue-ray disc) and light-emitting-diodes (LEDs); zinc oxide also finds many uses in optoelectronics and sensors…

Mathematical model could help predict and prevent future extinctions

— 19:25 GMT | Environment

In an effort to better understand the dynamics of complex networks, scientists have developed a mathematical model to describe interactions within ecological food webs. This research, performed by Northwestern University physics professor Adilson Motter and his student, Sagar Sahasrabudhe, is published in the January 25 issue of Nature Communications. The work illustrates how human intervention may effectively aid species conservation efforts…

Neuroscientists learn how channels fine-tune neuronal excitability

— 19:22 GMT | Health

Scientists in the Hotchkiss Brain Institute at the Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, have discovered a new mechanism that nerve cells (neurones) use to fine-tune their electrical output. The exciting discovery, published this week in the prestigious journal Nature Neuroscience, provides new insights about how the activity of the nervous system is regulated at the cellular level…

Dynamic systems in living cells break the rules

— 19:19 GMT | Biology

There is considerable interest in understanding transport and information pathways in living cells. It is crucial for both the transport of, for example, medicine into cells, the regulation of cell life processes and their signalling with their environment. New research in biophysics at the Niels Bohr Institute shows surprisingly that the transport mechanisms do not follow the expected pattern. The results have been published in the scientific journal Physical Review Letters…

UCLA researchers eliminate major roadblock in regenerative medicine

— 19:16 GMT | Health

In regenerative medicine, large supplies of safe and reliable human embryonic stem (hES) cells are needed for implantation into patients, but the field has faced challenges in developing cultures that can consistently grow and maintain clinical-grade stem cells…

Physicists take new look at the atom

— 19:13 GMT | Physics

Measuring the attractive forces between atoms and surfaces with unprecedented precision, University of Arizona physicists have produced data that could refine our understanding of the structure of atoms and improve nanotechnology. The discovery has been published in the journal Physical Review Letters…

Evolution by mistake

— 19:10 GMT | Biology

Charles Darwin based his groundbreaking theory of natural selection on the realisation that genetic variation among organisms is the key to evolution…

The world can be powered by alternative energy, using today's technology, in 20-40 years

— 19:07 GMT | Technology

If someone told you there was a way you could save 2.5 million to 3 million lives a year and simultaneously halt global warming, reduce air and water pollution and develop secure, reliable energy sources - nearly all with existing technology and at costs comparable with what we spend on energy today - why wouldn't you do it?…

Heart-targeting Listeria increase cardiac disease risk

— 19:04 GMT | Health

Certain strains of the food pathogen Listeria are uniquely adapted to infect heart tissues and may put people at a higher risk from serious cardiac disease, according to a new study published in the Journal of Medical Microbiology. Developing new diagnostic tests to identify these potentially fatal strains could protect those most at risk, such as those with heart valve replacements…

Star performer in basic biology labs diagnosed with first virus

— 19:01 GMT | Biology

A workhorse of modern biology is sick, and scientists couldn't be happier. Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, the Jacques Monod Institute in France and Cambridge University have found that the nematode C. elegans, a millimetre-long worm used extensively for decades to study many aspects of biology, can be targeted by naturally occurring viral infections. The discovery means C. elegans is likely to help scientists study the way viruses and their hosts interact. The findings will be published next week in the online, open access journal PLoS Biology…

26 January 2011 — 35 stories
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