August 2007 (Archive)

Boiling point
McDonald's recalls Shrek glasses due to potential cadmium risk — The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) just announced…
Hogchoker - the new Internet star — A small flatfish living along the coast of North America is the…
Cancer deaths are projected to double by 2030 — Cancer deaths are projected to double in the next two decades.…

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Minuscule
Wasps clock faces like humans — Face recognition in golden paper wasps may be an adaptation to…
Entangled diamonds vibrate together — Objects big enough for the eye to see have been placed in a weirdly…
How animals predict earthquakes — Animals may sense chemical changes in groundwater that occur…
New Icelandic volcano eruption could have global impact — Hundreds of metres under one of Iceland's largest glaciers there…

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News | Archive (28 August 2007)

Archived news stories published on 28 August 2007 [chronologically, reverse order]
DON'T MISS —
3-D surface treatment boosts solar cell efficiency
3-D surface treatment boosts solar cell efficiency — Using two different types of chemical etching to create features at both the micron and nanometre size scales, researchers…
Researchers develop flow sensors that mimic blind fish
Researchers develop flow sensors that mimic blind fish — A blind fish that has evolved a unique technique for sensing motion may inspire a new generation of sensors that perform…
Hearts of galaxies close in for cosmic train wreck
Hearts of galaxies close in for cosmic train wreck — A new image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope offers a rare view of an imminent collision between the cores of two merging…
Mars Express zeroes in on erosion features
Mars Express zeroes in on erosion features — Mars Express has uncovered geological evidence suggesting that some depositional process, revealed by erosion, has been at…

The most famous fossil Lucy debuts in Houston

— 22:02 GMT | Geology and palaeontology

Ethiopia is the cradle of mankind, the birthplace of coffee, the purported resting place of the Ark of the Covenant - and home to legions of Bob Marley fans. Discover five million years of this country's diverse history and culture in the world premiere exhibition 'Lucy's legacy: The hidden treasures of Ethiopia,' on display at the Houston Museum of Natural Science from 31 August 2007 - 20 April 2008. The exhibition will include the original fossilised remains of the 3.2 million-year-old hominid known as Lucy. With 40 percent of her skeleton intact, Lucy remains the oldest and most complete adult human ancestor fully retrieved from African soil…

New golden frog discovered in remote region of Colombia

— 15:49 GMT | Biology

A new poisonous frog was recently discovered in a remote mountainous region in Colombia by a team of young scientists supported by the Conservation Leadership Programme (CLP). The new frog, which is almost two centimetres in length, was given the name the 'golden frog of Supata.' Originally, the young scientists thought the frog was similar to several other common species in the area. However, after scientific analysis of the frog's characteristics, and review of their findings by experts at Conservation International, it was determined that the golden frog of Supata is unique and only found within a 20 hectare area in Colombia's Cundinamarca region…

Turbulent lessons from Titan

— 14:40 GMT | Astronomy

Have you spilled your drink on an airliner? Researchers on both sides of the Atlantic are finding new ways to understand turbulence, both in the Earth's atmosphere and that of Saturn's moon Titan. Turbulence is an important process in our weather, and can be more than an inconvenience; causing hundreds of injuries on commercial flights. Working together, researchers have shown that Huygens had a bumpy ride to Titan and improved the instrumentation that will be used to measure such effects on Earth in future…

Sex is thirst-quenching for female beetles

— 14:40 GMT | Biology

Female beetles mate to quench their thirst according to new research by a scientist from the University of Exeter's School of Biosciences. The males of some insect species, including certain types of beetles, moths and crickets, produce unusually large ejaculates, which in some cases can account for around 10% of their body weight. The study shows that dehydrated females can accept sexual invitations simply to get hold of the water in the seminal fluid…

Scientists see first signs of long-term changes in tropical rainfall

— 14:40 GMT | Environment

NASA scientists have detected the first signs that tropical rainfall is on the rise, using the longest and most complete data record available. The international scientific community assembled a 27-year global record of rainfall from satellite and ground-based instruments. The researchers found the rainiest years between 1979 and 2005 occurred primarily after 2001. The wettest year was 2005, followed by 2004, 2003, 2002 and 1998. The study appeared in the 1 August issue of the American Meteorological Society's Journal of Climate. The rainfall increase was concentrated over tropical oceans, with a slight decline over land…

28 August 2007 — 5 stories
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More on Science Centric's News

Young dinosaurs roamed together, died togetherYoung dinosaurs roamed together, died together

— A herd of young birdlike dinosaurs met their death on the muddy margins of a lake some 90 million years ago, according to a team of Chinese and American palaeontologists…

Plant biologists discover gene that switches on 'essence of male'Plant biologists discover gene that switches on 'essence of male'

— Biologists at the University of Leicester have published results of a new study into plant sex - and discovered that a particular gene switches on 'the essence of…