September 2010 (Archive)

Boiling point
McDonald's recalls Shrek glasses due to potential cadmium risk — The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) just announced…
Hogchoker - the new Internet star — A small flatfish living along the coast of North America is the…
Cancer deaths are projected to double by 2030 — Cancer deaths are projected to double in the next two decades.…

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Minuscule
Wasps clock faces like humans — Face recognition in golden paper wasps may be an adaptation to…
Entangled diamonds vibrate together — Objects big enough for the eye to see have been placed in a weirdly…
How animals predict earthquakes — Animals may sense chemical changes in groundwater that occur…
New Icelandic volcano eruption could have global impact — Hundreds of metres under one of Iceland's largest glaciers there…

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News | Archive (28 September 2010)

Archived news stories published on 28 September 2010 [chronologically, reverse order]
DON'T MISS —
Hareless: Yellowstone's rabbits have vanished
Hareless: Yellowstone's rabbits have vanished — A new study by the Bronx Zoo-based Wildlife Conservation Society found that jack rabbits living in the Greater Yellowstone…
Two new planets discovered in a faraway solar system
Two new planets discovered in a faraway solar system — An international team of astronomers has discovered two planets that resemble smaller versions of Jupiter and Saturn in a…
Titan's surface organics surpass oil reserves on Earth
Titan's surface organics surpass oil reserves on Earth — Saturn's orange moon Titan has hundreds of times more liquid hydrocarbons than all the known oil and natural gas reserves…
Possible progenitor of special supernova type detected
Possible progenitor of special supernova type detected — Using data from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, scientists have reported the possible detection of a binary star system…

Mindfulness meditation may ease fatigue, depression in multiple sclerosis

— 14:30 GMT | Health

Learning mindfulness meditation may help people who have multiple sclerosis (MS) with the fatigue, depression and other life challenges that commonly accompany the disease, according to a study published in the September 28, 2010, issue of Neurology(R), the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology…

Sugary sports drinks mistakenly associated with being healthy, say UTHealth researchers

— 14:27 GMT | Health

Children who practice healthy lifestyle habits such as eating fruits and vegetables and engaging in physical activity may be negatively impacting their health because they tend to consume large amounts of flavoured and sports beverages containing sugar, according to research at The Michael and Susan Dell Centre for Healthy Living at The University of Texas Health Science Centre at Houston (UTHealth)…

Single electron reader opens path for quantum computing

— 14:24 GMT | Technology

A team led by engineers and physicists at the University of New South Wales (UNSW) in Sydney, Australia, have developed one of the key building blocks needed to make a quantum computer using silicon: a 'single electron reader.' Their work was published today in Nature…

Scientists discover gene linked to a common form of migraine

— 14:21 GMT | Health

An international study led by scientists at Universite de Montreal and University of Oxford, has identified a gene associated with common migraines. Their findings show that a mutation in the KCNK18 gene inhibits the function of a protein called TRESK. TRESK normally plays a key role in nerve cell communication. Published today in Nature Medicine, this study may have implications for people who suffer from recurrent headaches, which include more than six million Canadians…

Complexity not so costly after all, analysis shows

— 14:18 GMT | Biology

The more complex a plant or animal, the more difficulty it should have adapting to changes in the environment. That's been a maxim of evolutionary theory since biologist Ronald Fisher put forth the idea in 1930…

A shot to the heart: Nanoneedle delivers quantum dots to cell nucleus

— 14:15 GMT | Health

Getting an inside look at the centre of a cell can be as easy as a needle prick, thanks to University of Illinois researchers who have developed a tiny needle to deliver a shot right to a cell's nucleus…

Quarks 'swing' to the tones of random numbers

— 14:12 GMT | Physics

At the Large Hadron Collider at CERN protons crash into each other at incredibly high energies in order to 'smash' the protons and to study the elementary particles of nature - including quarks. Quarks are found in each proton and are bound together by forces which cause all other known forces of nature to fade. To understand the effects of these strong forces between the quarks is one of the greatest challenges in modern particle physics. New theoretical results from the Niels Bohr Institute show that enormous quantities of random numbers can describe the way in which quarks 'swing' inside the protons. The results have been published in arXiv and will be published in the journal Physical Review Letters…

Right or left? Brain stimulation can change which hand you favour

— 14:09 GMT | Health

Each time we perform a simple task, like pushing an elevator button or reaching for a cup of coffee, the brain races to decide whether the left or right hand will do the job. But the left hand is more likely to win if a certain region of the brain receives magnetic stimulation, according to new research from the University of California, Berkeley…

Fungal spores travel farther by surfing their own wind

— 14:06 GMT | Biology

Long before geese started flying in chevron formation or cyclists learned the value of drafting, fungi discovered an aerodynamic way to reduce drag on their spores so as to spread them as high and as far as possible…

Rapid test to save Indian vultures from extinction

— 14:03 GMT | Environment

Diclofenac, an anti-inflammatory agent, has been deployed successfully in human medicine for decades. In most EU countries medication containing Diclofenac is only approved for treatment of humans. In India, Pakistan and Nepal it has been deployed in veterinary medicine as well since the 90s, in particular for livestock. When vultures feed on cattle carcasses, they too ingest the drug. As a result, the populations of three species of these birds of prey - the Indian vulture, the Oriental white-backed vulture and the slender-billed vulture - have shrunk to a mere three percent of their original number…

28 September 2010 — 36 stories
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