August 2007 (Archive)

Boiling point
McDonald's recalls Shrek glasses due to potential cadmium risk — The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) just announced…
Hogchoker - the new Internet star — A small flatfish living along the coast of North America is the…
Cancer deaths are projected to double by 2030 — Cancer deaths are projected to double in the next two decades.…

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Minuscule
Wasps clock faces like humans — Face recognition in golden paper wasps may be an adaptation to…
Entangled diamonds vibrate together — Objects big enough for the eye to see have been placed in a weirdly…
How animals predict earthquakes — Animals may sense chemical changes in groundwater that occur…
New Icelandic volcano eruption could have global impact — Hundreds of metres under one of Iceland's largest glaciers there…

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News | Archive (29 August 2007)

Archived news stories published on 29 August 2007 [chronologically, reverse order]
DON'T MISS —
Scientists discover how deadly fungus protects itself
Scientists discover how deadly fungus protects itself — Researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University have discovered how a deadly microbe evades the…
Exercise critical to recovery after knee replacement
Exercise critical to recovery after knee replacement — It may be uncomfortable at first, but doing exercises to strengthen your quadriceps after you've had knee replacement surgery…
Early human skulls shaped for nut-cracking
Early human skulls shaped for nut-cracking — New research conducted in part by researchers at The George Washington University has led to novel insights into how feeding…
What happens when a stone impacts on water
What happens when a stone impacts on water — Researchers at the Foundation for Fundamental Research on Matter (FOM), the University of Twente in the Netherlands and the…

Supersonic rain falls on newborn star: Forming solar system deluged with oceans of water

— 17:10 GMT | Astronomy

Astronomers at the University of Rochester have discovered five Earth-oceans' worth of water that has recently fallen into the planet-forming region around an extremely young, developing star. Dan Watson, professor of physics and astronomy at the University of Rochester, believes he and his colleagues are the first to see a short-lived stage of protoplanetary disk formation, and the manner in which a planetary system's supply of water arrives from the natal envelope within which its parent star originally formed…

Mars rovers begin atmospheric observations

— 17:10 GMT | Astronomy

Mars rover scientists have launched a new long-term study on the Martian atmosphere with the Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer, an instrument that was originally developed at the University of Chicago. Thanasis Economou, Senior Scientist at Chicago's Enrico Fermi Institute, suggested the new study after observing that the APXS instruments aboard NASA's twin Mars rovers, Spirit and Opportunity, had recorded fluctuations in the argon composition of the Martian atmosphere. 'The amount of argon in the atmosphere is changing constantly,' Economou said…

NASA study will help stop stowaways to Mars

— 17:10 GMT | Astronomy

Gene sequencing uncovers many more bacteria in super-clean facilities than previous monitoring methods, including newly discovered species. NASA clean rooms, where scientists and engineers assemble spacecraft, have joined hot springs, ice caves, and deep mines as unlikely places where scientists have discovered ultra-hardy organisms collectively known as 'extremophiles.' Some species of bacteria uncovered in a recent NASA study have never been detected anywhere else…

One of the most curious objects in the sky delights astronomers again

— 10:29 GMT | Astronomy

Edwin Hubble once called IC 10 'one of the most curious objects in the sky.' It is an irregular galaxy in the constellation Cassiopeia. New observations of the extremely faint, lightweight dwarf galaxy are giving scientists new clues about how populations of stars are born. Though the properties of stars is one of the most well-studied topics in astronomy, scientists still don't fully understand all the mechanisms involved in star formation and evolution, particularly in galaxies with low levels of oxygen, nitrogen and other heavy elements. But scientists studying the IC 10 galaxy may soon understand how stars might have looked like in the distant past, when the universe was in a younger, more pristine form…

29 August 2007 — 4 stories
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