September 2010 (Archive)

Boiling point
McDonald's recalls Shrek glasses due to potential cadmium risk — The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) just announced…
Hogchoker - the new Internet star — A small flatfish living along the coast of North America is the…
Cancer deaths are projected to double by 2030 — Cancer deaths are projected to double in the next two decades.…

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Minuscule
Wasps clock faces like humans — Face recognition in golden paper wasps may be an adaptation to…
Entangled diamonds vibrate together — Objects big enough for the eye to see have been placed in a weirdly…
How animals predict earthquakes — Animals may sense chemical changes in groundwater that occur…
New Icelandic volcano eruption could have global impact — Hundreds of metres under one of Iceland's largest glaciers there…

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News | Archive (30 September 2010)

Archived news stories published on 30 September 2010 [chronologically, reverse order]
DON'T MISS —
Trapping charged particles with laser light
Trapping charged particles with laser light — In the past decades setups for trapping single particles have played a key role in high precision quantum measurements because…
New cometary phenomenon greets approaching spacecraft
New cometary phenomenon greets approaching spacecraft — Recent observations of comet Hartley 2 have scientists scratching their heads, while they anticipate a flyby of the small,…
Spring has sprung on Titan
Spring has sprung on Titan — NASA's Cassini spacecraft has sent back dreamy raw images of Saturn's moon Titan that show the appearance of clouds around…
Astronomers find weird, warm spot on an exoplanet
Astronomers find weird, warm spot on an exoplanet — Observations from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope reveal a distant planet with a warm spot in the wrong place. The gas-giant…

Penn biologists say species accumulate on Earth at slower rates than in the past

— 13:20 GMT | Biology

Computational biologists at the University of Pennsylvania say that species are still accumulating on Earth but at a slower rate than in the past…

One-dimensional window on superconductivity, magnetism

— 13:17 GMT | Physics

A Rice University-led team of physicists is reporting the first success in a three-year effort to build a precision simulator for superconductors using a grid of intersecting laser beams and ultracold atomic gas…

Research lays foundation for building on the moon - or anywhere else

— 13:14 GMT | Technology

The key to the stability of any building is its foundation, but it is difficult to test some building sites in advance - such as those on the moon. New research from North Carolina State University is helping resolve the problem by using computer models that can utilise a small sample of soil to answer fundamental questions about how soil at a building site will interact with foundations…

Red light regulates nectar secretion

— 13:11 GMT | Biology

Flowering plants produce nectar to attract insect pollinators. Some plant species, such as the Lima bean, not only secrete nectar from their flowers but also from so-called extrafloral nectaries to attract ants which in turn fend off herbivores. Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology in Jena, Germany, have discovered that the production of extrafloral nectar is light dependent. Using a special photoreceptor, the phytochrome, scientists have shown that the plants are able not only to distinguish between day and night, but also to adapt their nectar secretion to current light conditions. The phytochrome probably influences the regulation of a special enzyme that binds the plant hormone jasmonic acid to the amino acid isoleucine. The emerging molecule affects the secretion of extrafloral nectar in such a way that the plant's defence against herbivores is most effective whenever herbivory is most likely - or, more precisely, during the day…

K-State researchers honoured for influential contributions to software engineering field

— 13:08 GMT | Technology

For two Kansas State University professors, receiving one of software engineering's most prestigious awards was more than 10 years in the making…

Research examines vicious cycle of overeating and obesity

— 13:05 GMT | Health

New research provides evidence of the vicious cycle created when an obese individual overeats to compensate for reduced pleasure from food…

After traumatic event, early intervention reduces odds of PTSD in children by 73 percent

— 13:02 GMT | Health

After experiencing a potentially traumatic event - a car accident, a physical or sexual assault, a sports injury, witnessing violence - as many as 1 in 5 children will develop Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)…

Purifying proteins: Rensselaer researchers use NMR to improve drug development

— 12:59 GMT | Health

The purification of drug components is a large hurdle facing modern drug development. This is particularly true of drugs that utilise proteins, which are notoriously difficult to separate from other potentially deadly impurities. Scientists within the Centre for Biotechnology and Interdisciplinary Studies (CBIS) at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute are using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to understand and improve an important protein purification process…

Smartphone apps harvest, spread personal info

— 12:56 GMT | Technology

Publicly available cell-phone applications from application markets are releasing consumers' private information to online advertisers, according to a joint study by Intel Labs, Penn State, and Duke University…

Milky Way sidelined in galactic tug of war

— 12:53 GMT | Astronomy

The Magellanic Stream is an arc of hydrogen gas spanning more than 100 degrees of the sky as it trails behind the Milky Way's neighbour galaxies, the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds. Our home galaxy, the Milky Way, has long been thought to be the dominant gravitational force in forming the Stream by pulling gas from the Clouds. A new computer simulation by Gurtina Besla (Harvard-Smithsonian Centre for Astrophysics) and her colleagues now shows, however, that the Magellanic Stream resulted from a past close encounter between these dwarf galaxies rather than effects of the Milky Way…

30 September 2010 — 44 stories
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