August 2007 (Archive)

Boiling point
McDonald's recalls Shrek glasses due to potential cadmium risk — The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) just announced…
Hogchoker - the new Internet star — A small flatfish living along the coast of North America is the…
Cancer deaths are projected to double by 2030 — Cancer deaths are projected to double in the next two decades.…

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Minuscule
Wasps clock faces like humans — Face recognition in golden paper wasps may be an adaptation to…
Entangled diamonds vibrate together — Objects big enough for the eye to see have been placed in a weirdly…
How animals predict earthquakes — Animals may sense chemical changes in groundwater that occur…
New Icelandic volcano eruption could have global impact — Hundreds of metres under one of Iceland's largest glaciers there…

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News | Archive (August 2007) [Page 2]

Archived news stories published in August 2007 [chronologically, reverse order]
DON'T MISS —
Glacial erosion changes mountain responses to plate tectonics
Glacial erosion changes mountain responses to plate tectonics — Intense glacial erosion has not only carved the surface of the highest coastal mountain range on earth, the spectacular St.…
Alzheimer's gene slows export of toxic amyloid-beta protein
Alzheimer's gene slows export of toxic amyloid-beta protein — The only known genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease slows down the brain's ability to export a toxic protein known…
New iron-based material may unlock supercondcutivity's big secret
New iron-based material may unlock supercondcutivity's big secret — Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) are decoding the mysterious mechanisms behind the…
Novel system proposed to optimise combined energy use
Novel system proposed to optimise combined energy use — Engineers from the University of Zaragoza have developed an algorithm that can optimise hybrid electricity generation systems…

Turbulent lessons from Titan

— 28 Aug 2007 | Astronomy

Have you spilled your drink on an airliner? Researchers on both sides of the Atlantic are finding new ways to understand turbulence, both in the Earth's atmosphere and that of Saturn's moon Titan. Turbulence is an important process in our weather, and can be more than an inconvenience; causing hundreds of injuries on commercial flights. Working together, researchers have shown that Huygens had a bumpy ride to Titan and improved the instrumentation that will be used to measure such effects on Earth in future…

Sex is thirst-quenching for female beetles

— 28 Aug 2007 | Biology

Female beetles mate to quench their thirst according to new research by a scientist from the University of Exeter's School of Biosciences. The males of some insect species, including certain types of beetles, moths and crickets, produce unusually large ejaculates, which in some cases can account for around 10% of their body weight. The study shows that dehydrated females can accept sexual invitations simply to get hold of the water in the seminal fluid…

Scientists see first signs of long-term changes in tropical rainfall

— 28 Aug 2007 | Environment

NASA scientists have detected the first signs that tropical rainfall is on the rise, using the longest and most complete data record available. The international scientific community assembled a 27-year global record of rainfall from satellite and ground-based instruments. The researchers found the rainiest years between 1979 and 2005 occurred primarily after 2001. The wettest year was 2005, followed by 2004, 2003, 2002 and 1998. The study appeared in the 1 August issue of the American Meteorological Society's Journal of Climate. The rainfall increase was concentrated over tropical oceans, with a slight decline over land…

Jupiter: Friend or Foe?

— 27 Aug 2007 | Astronomy

The traditional belief that Jupiter acts as a celestial shield, deflecting asteroids and comets away from the inner Solar System, has been challenged by the first in a series of studies evaluating the impact risk to the Earth posed by different groups of object. On Friday 24th August at the European Planetary Science Congress in Potsdam, Dr Jonathan Horner presented a study of the impact hazard posed to Earth by the Centaurs, the parent population of the Jupiter Family of comets (JFCs). The results show that the presence of a Jupiter-like planet in the Solar System does not necessarily lead to a lower impact rate at the Earth…

Could the icy plumes of Enceladus pose a hazard to Cassini?

— 27 Aug 2007 | Astronomy

On 12th March 2008, Cassini will swing by Saturn's moon Enceladus at an altitude of less than 100 kilometres at the point of closest approach. This will give scientists and unprecedented opportunity to study the plumes of water vapour emanating from the 'tiger stripe' fissures near the moon's south pole, but it has also given the Cassini team pause for thought as to whether ice grains lofted by the jets could damage the spacecraft…

How snakes survive starvation

— 27 Aug 2007 | Biology

Starving snakes employ novel survival strategies not seen before in vertebrates, according to research conducted by a University of Arkansas biologist. These findings could be used in conservation strategies to determine the health of snake populations. 'These animals take energy reduction to a whole new level,' said Marshall McCue, a graduate student in biological sciences in the J. William Fulbright College of Arts and Sciences. He reported his findings in the journal Zoology…

Astronomers pioneer new method for probing exotic matter

— 27 Aug 2007 | Astronomy

Using European and Japanese/NASA X-ray satellites, astronomers have seen Einstein's predicted distortion of space-time around three neutron stars, and in doing so they have pioneered a groundbreaking technique for determining the properties of these ultradense objects. Neutron stars contain the most dense observable matter in the universe. They cram more than a sun's worth of material into a city-sized sphere, meaning a few cups of neutron-star stuff would outweigh Mount Everest. Astronomers use these collapsed stars as natural laboratories to study how tightly matter can be crammed under the most extreme pressures that nature can offer…

Pro-Am collaboration to unveil the atmosphere of Venus

— 27 Aug 2007 | Astronomy

Results from an ongoing collaboration between amateur astronomers and the European Space Agency to support the Venus Express mission will be presented at the European Planetary Science Congress in Potsdam on Wednesday 22nd August. Silvia Kowollik, from the Zollern-Alb Observatory in Germany and one of the participants in the project, said, 'This is the first time there's been a European collaboration between amateur astronomers and scientists. In the United States, they have a long tradition and a lot of experience in this kind of work. In Europe we are just starting…

Calculating the biomass of Martian soil

— 27 Aug 2007 | Astronomy

A new interpretation of data from NASA's Viking landers indicates that 0.1% of the Martian soil tested could have a biological origin. Dr Joop Houtkooper of the University of Giessen, Germany, believes that the subfreezing, arid Martian surface could be home to organisms whose cells are filled with a mixture of hydrogen peroxide and water. In a presentation at the European Planetary Science Congress in Potsdam on Friday 24th August, Dr Houtkooper will describe how he has used data from the Gas Exchange (GEx) experiment, carried by NASA's Viking landers, to estimate the biomass in the Martian soil…

Total lunar eclipse on Tuesday, but not visible in Europe or Africa

— 26 Aug 2007 | Astronomy

If the weather is clear on Tuesday (28 August) prepare yourself for one of the most spectacular cosmic events visible from the Earth - a total lunar eclipse. It will be visible in the Pacific basin, from East Asia and Australia to the west coast of North America, but not in Europe or Africa…

August 2007 — 107 stories
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